miles in two hours it died."


As a final instance of the force of limitations in the development
of concentration, I must mention that beautiful creature, Helen
Keller, whom I have known for these many years. I am filled with the
wonder of her knowledge, acquired because shut out from all
distraction. If I could have been deaf, dumb, and blind I also might
have arrived at something.
VOTES FOR WOMEN.

AT THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE HEBREW TECHNICAL
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, HELD IN THE TEMPLE
EMMANUEL, JANUARY 20, 1901

Mr. Clemens was introduced by President Meyer, who said: "In one
of Mr. Clemens's works he expressed his opinion of men, saying he
had no choice between Hebrew and Gentile, black men or white; to him
all men were alike. But I never could find that he expressed his
opinion of women; perhaps that opinion was so exalted that he could
not express it. We shall now be called to hear what he thinks of
women."

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,- It is a small help that I can afford, but
it is just such help that one can give as coming from the heart
through the mouth. The report of Mr. Meyer was admirable, and I was as
interested in it as you have been. Why, I'm twice as old as he, and
I've had so much experience that I would say to him, when he makes his
appeal for help: "Don't make it for to-day or to-morrow, but collect
the money on the spot."
We are all creatures of sudden impulse. We must be worked up by
steam, as it were. Get them to write their wills now, or it may be too
late by-and-by. Fifteen or twenty years ago I had an experience I
shall never forget. I got into a church which was crowded by a
sweltering and panting multitude. The city missionary of our town-
Hartford- made a telling appeal for help. He t